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The Best Comforters for Your Bed

Top-tested covers for every temperature and fill preference.

Best Down Comforter
Danielle Occhiogrosso Daly

This article was updated in September 2022 to reflect new test results from Good Housekeeping's 2022 Best Bedding Awards. Buffy's Cloud Comforter became our pick for the best overall comforter, and new styles from Crane & Canopy, Riley, Slumber Cloud and Birch were added.


Finding the perfect comforter is essential for a good night's sleep. It should keep you warm — but not too hot — while remaining soft night after night. With so many options to choose from, it's important to find the right comforter for your specific needs by considering the fill type and temperature level. And to make sure you're investing in one that'll last, also consider durability features like the construction, materials and washability.

The Good Housekeeping Institute Textiles Lab tests dozens of covers each year, including down comforters, down-alternative comforters, duvet inserts and more to find the best ones on the market. We closely inspect the construction for aspects like how well it can keep the fill secure and how soft and quiet it'll be on your bed, and we then have at-home sleep testers use it for an extended period before providing firsthand feedback. In the past few years, we've tested over 50 different comforters and reviewed more than 400 data points from both Lab and consumer tests to find the best options for every type of sleeper.

Our top picks:

You can find more information about how we test and how to shop for comforters at the end of this article, but first, here's everything you need to know about our top-tested picks, with prices listed for queen sizes.

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1
Best Overall Comforter
Buffy
Cloud Comforter
Buffy
Now 20% off
Fill material Polyester
Outer cover Tencell lyocell
Construction Stitched through
Sizes Twin/Twin XL, Full/Queen and King/California King
2
Best Value Comforter
Linenspa
All-Season Down Alternative Comforter
Linenspa
Fill material Polyester
Outer cover Polyester
Sizes Twin, Twin XL, Full, Queen, King, California King, Oversized Queen and Oversized King
Construction Box stitch
3
Best Down Comforter
The Company Store
Alberta Euro Down Comforter
The Company Store
Fill material Down
Outer cover Cotton sateen
Construction Baffle box
Sizes Twin, Full, Queen and King
4
Best Down Alternative Comforter
Crane & Canopy
Ultimate Luxe Down Alternative Comforter
Crane & Canopy
Fill material Polyester
Outer cover Cotton
Construction Baffle box
Available sizes Twin/Twin XL, Full/Queen, King/California King
5
Best Warm Comforter for Winter
Riley
White Goose Down Comforter
Riley
Fill material Down
Outer cover Cotton
Construction Baffle box
Available sizes Twin/Twin XL, Full/Queen, King/California King
6
Best Luxury Comforter
L.L.Bean
Permabaffle Box Goose Down Comforter
L.L.Bean
Fill material Down
Outer cover Cotton
Construction Baffle box
Sizes Twin, Full, King and Queen
7
Best Cooling Comforter for Summer
SlumberCloud
Lightweight Comforter
Slumber Cloud
Fill material Polyester
Outer cover Cotton
Construction Box stitch
Available sizes Twin/Twin XL, Full/Queen, King/California King
8
Best Comforter for Couples
Birch
Natural Down Duvet Insert
Birch
Fill material Down/wool blend
Outer cover Cotton
Construction Baffle box
Available sizes Twin, Full/Queen, King/California King
9
Best Down & Feather Comforter
StyleWell
Down Feather Blend Comforter
Stylewell
Fill material Down and feathers
Outer cover Cotton
Construction Box stitch
Sizes Twin, Full/Queen and King
How we test comforters
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The Good Housekeeping Institute regularly tests comforters and duvet inserts (terms that are often used interchangeably when you shop). First, our Textiles Lab pros thoroughly inspect the comforters to get a sense of both standout features and any negative callouts. We then coordinate at-home sleep testing with consumers to get detailed feedback on how it performs in real life. Here's what we consider when evaluating each comforter:

✔️ Craftsmanship: We inspect construction for elements like stitching at the seams, corner loops or tabs for duvet cover attachment and baffle-box vs. box-stitch designs. We also note aspects like how the fabric feels upon unboxing, whether any fill is poking through the material and whether there are any odors.

After testers complete their review, they also weigh in on whether the fill shifted during use and whether it shed through the outer fabric. If they use a duvet cover, they note whether it was easy to attach to the comforter.

✔️ Washability: Lab pros consider whether the comforters can be machine washed and if they require special instructions. We also ask at-home users to share their experiences with laundering the comforters.

✔️ Noise level: Some comforters are constructed with noisy outer covers, so we consider how quiet the fabric is when it moves. Consumer testers also rate noise level after sleeping under the comforters.

✔️ Comfort: This is key when it comes to bedding, so we have our testers rate various aspects like overall comfort, feel of the outer fabric and overall satisfaction. They also provide answers to open-ended questions on anything they specifically liked or disliked.

✔️ Temperature: Our pros review cooling characteristics, and testers share whether they maintained a comfortable body temperature while sleeping under the comforter.

✔️ Certifications: We check whether the claims are validated by trusted third parties where relevant, like the Responsible Down Standard (which ensures ducks and geese are treated humanely), Global Recycling Standard and Global Organic Textiles Standard.

✔️ Down standards: We also ensure that down products meet labeling standards for down and feathers, including like fill power and percentage of down in fill blends.

What is the best fill material for a comforter?
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Down is often considered the best fill material (and with good reason!), but the truth is that it's a matter of personal preference. Here are the top fill materials for comforters and how to choose which one is right for you:

✔️ Down: Not to be confused with feathers, down is a fluffy cluster from the undercoat of ducks and geese. It offers top-notch insulation because it's lofty makeup traps in air to provide warmth without the weight. Down feels luxurious, but costs more than down alternative and can sometimes be more difficult to clean. You can also find down-feather blends for a lower cost, but they won't be as fluffy.

If you shop for down, opt for one that's certified by the Responsible Down Standard to ensure the supply chain is properly traced. This verifies that the ducks and geese are not forced fed or live plucked.

✔️ Down alternative: Typically made of polyester, this fill costs less than down and is a great option if you prefer to shop animal-free. Sometimes polyester can cause overheating, but newer constructions can allow these materials to be more breathable and temperature-regulating. Down alternative is also typically easier to care for than real down, and you can sometimes find the fills made from recycled plastic to reduce their environmental impact.

What to look for when shopping for a comforter
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Besides choosing the fill, here's what else you should keep in mind as you shop for your best comforter:

✔️ Stay-in-place construction: In order to prevent the fill from shifting around and clumping (which could result in cold spots), check for a baffle box construction. This means there are vertical walls of fabric on the inside to help keep the fill in place. Less expensive comforters typically use a box stitch construction, which means the sections are separated like a quilt. Oftentimes box stitching can be sufficient, but it can sometimes allow a down fill to shift.

✔️ Downproof materials: Most down comforters have a 100% cotton outer fabric, and in those cases the thread count can be an indicator that it's tightly woven to keep the fill from poking through. If the cover is cotton and the thread count is listed, look for one that's at least 300. With other outer cover materials like lyocell and polyester, thread count won't be as relevant, but these fabrics typically don't have down fills so this isn't as much of a concern.

✔️ Fill power: Also specific to down, you'll typically see a fill power listed (just like you'll find on down-insulated winter coats). The higher the fill power, the more space the down clusters take up, meaning more air gets trapped to give you warmth without adding weight. If you're looking for good warmth in winter weather, we recommend a fill power of 600 or higher.

✔️ Warmth levels: Some comforters offer just one level, while others give you two to three options ranging from lightweight to all-season to extra warm. Typically a mid-level warmth is great for year-round use, but sometimes users prefer to swap out their bedding in the summer or winter months. The levels usually vary by the amount (or weight) of fill. Warmer comforters will have more fill, while cooling comforters will be more lightweight.

✔️ Care instructions: Some comforters are dry clean only, but all of the comforters in this article are machine washable. Just keep in mind, there should be room for the comforter to move around while it's washing and drying. You may need to use a large capacity or commercial grade machine. It's also a good idea to use dryer balls and pause the drying cycle to manually fluff the comforter, which will help prevent clumps.

✔️ Return period: Sometimes online bedding brands offer an any-reason return period so you can make sure you love your purchase — especially when you can't feel it first in stores. These return periods can range from a few days to a few months, so make sure to check before you buy.

What's the difference between a duvet and comforter?
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Technically a comforter is intended to be used on its own, while a duvet insert is meant to go inside of a duvet cover. Traditionally, comforters may be more decorative to be used on their own. That being said, the two terms are often used interchangeably while you shop. All of the comforters we recommend can be used on their own or inside of a duvet cover.

Stand-alone comforters skip the fuss of adding a duvet cover each time you wash it. On the flip side, using a duvet cover means you can wash just the cover — not the entire comforter — on a regular basis to keep it clean and protect it from wear and tear, helping it to last longer.

Why trust Good Housekeeping?
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Lexie Sachs is the Executive Director of the Textiles, Paper & Apparel Lab at the Good Housekeeping Institute, where she oversees all bedding testing, including comforters. Lexie has been hands-on evaluating comforters in the Lab for 10 years and uses her background in fiber science to personally inspect every comforter before it gets reviewed by sleep testers. She also tries out most comforters in her own home to experience the various types firsthand.

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